Can CBD and cannabis products help with acne and psoriasis? Dermatologists advise buyers to be cautious.

Can CBD and cannabis products help with acne and psoriasis? Dermatologists advise buyers to be cautious.

(HealthDay)— Many people are turning to CBD or cannabis products to treat skin conditions such as acne or rosacea, but researchers warn that research on their safety and effectiveness hasn’t kept up with demand.

When more than 500 adults were polled about their use of CBD (cannabidiol) or marijuana, 17.6 percent said they used an over-the-counter cannabis product to treat skin conditions like acne, psoriasis, rosacea, or eczema without a dermatologist’s recommendation, and even more were interested in trying these products.

CBD is derived from hemp, a close relative of the marijuana plant, but unlike THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol), the active ingredient in marijuana, CBD does not cause intoxication.

“People are using these products without consulting a doctor, and even those who aren’t using them are curious,” said study author Dr. Adam Friedman, chair of dermatology at the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, D.C.

He believes it is time for science to catch up.

Early animal data suggests that these products may aid in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. “We know that cannabinoids activate the body’s resolvin pathway, which helps to resolve inflammation,” Friedman explained. “Cannabinoids set the stage for inflammation to resolve and recruit the players critical to cleaning up the damage caused by inflammation.”

Approximately 89 percent of people believe marijuana or other cannabis products have a role in the treatment of skin disease, and the majority said they would be willing to try one of these products if their dermatologist gave them the go-ahead.

Can CBD and cannabis products help with acne and psoriasis? Dermatologists advise buyers to be cautious.

The United States holds a CBD hearing as supporters and sellers await legal clarification.

The United States holds a CBD hearing as supporters and sellers await legal clarification.

Despite the legal ambiguity surrounding CBD products, their popularity has skyrocketed. Now, regulators in the United States are looking into ways to officially allow hemp as an ingredient in food, beverages, and dietary supplements.

The FDA held a hearing on Friday to gather information about cannabis compounds such as CBD, which is already available in candy, syrups, oils, drinks, skin patches, and dog food. CBD-containing products are already available in stores and online.

Although no decisions are expected right away, the hearing is viewed as an important step toward clarifying regulations surrounding the ingredient.

The FDA issued warning letters to companies last month for making unapproved health claims about CBD products.

CBD does not cause euphoria. It is frequently derived from hemp, a cannabis plant defined by the US government as containing less than 0.3 percent THC, the compound responsible for marijuana’s mind-altering effect.

For the time being, the FDA has stated that CBD is not permitted in food, beverages, or supplements, but that it is looking into ways to allow its use. To add to the confusion, some states, such as Colorado, allow it in food and beverages. Restaurants and stores in New York City have continued to sell products despite officials’ warnings that it is not permitted in food and beverages.

“A state patchwork of different standards is difficult for everyone,” said Shawn Hauser, a marijuana law and policy expert.

The United States holds a CBD hearing as supporters and sellers await legal clarification.

In just seven years, the number of adolescent marijuana vapers has more than doubled.

In just seven years, the number of adolescent marijuana vapers has more than doubled.

(HealthDay)— Teenagers have followed the vaping trend into marijuana use, with recent studies documenting a surge in marijuana vaping among adolescents in the United States and Canada, according to researchers.

According to the study, the percentage of teens who have experimented with vaped marijuana has more than doubled in recent years, and vaping among frequent marijuana users has quadrupled.

According to a new analysis of data from 17 different studies, one in every eight North American teenagers has vaped marijuana in the last year, and nearly one in every ten has done so in the last month.

“The prevalence of adolescent cannabis vaping is on the rise in the United States and Canada,” said lead researcher Carmen Lim, a Ph.D. candidate at Australia’s University of Queensland’s National Center for Youth Substance Use Research. “We also discovered that adolescent cannabis product preferences are shifting from less potent products like herbal cannabis to highly potent vape oil and concentrates.”

The proportion of teens who had tried marijuana vaping increased from around 6% in 2013-2016 to nearly 14% in 2019-2020. During the same time period, the proportion of children who had vaped marijuana in the previous year increased from 7% to 13%.

More frequent marijuana users jumped into vaping even faster, with the percentage of teens vaping marijuana in the previous month more than quadrupling—from less than 2% to more than 8%.

This new study did not look at overall marijuana use among teenagers, so it’s unclear whether more kids are using pot because of vaping or if kids who smoke pot have switched to vaping, according to Lim.

According to experts, it’s highly likely that kids are switching from joints to vape pens because the overall number of marijuana-using teens has increased more slowly.

“As vaping and cannabis become more acceptable in society and smoking becomes less preferred, it seems natural that young people would adopt this form of substance intake,” said Patricia Folan, director of the Center for Tobacco Control at Northwell Health in Great Neck, New York.

According to the researchers, these figures were derived from data compiled from nearly 200,000 adolescents who took part in marijuana-related studies between 2013 and 2020.

In just seven years, the number of adolescent marijuana vapers has more than doubled.

Is there a new high for migraine treatment? The trial investigates the efficacy of THC and CBD.

Is there a new high for migraine treatment? The trial investigates the efficacy of THC and CBD.

Allison Knigge began having migraines when she was in elementary school. They became progressively worse over time, particularly after the birth of her son.

“My migraines are described as piercing pain. It’s as if my mind is being squeezed. It causes extreme sensitivity to light and sound, as well as horrendous nausea “Knigge stated. “I’ve experienced pain levels of 6 or higher for approximately 25 days out of the month. They have an impact on my quality of life.”

Migraines cause symptoms that are frequently severe and incapacitating. They cause severe throbbing or pulsating headaches, usually on one side of the head, and are frequently accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and/or extreme sensitivity to light and sound. A migraine attack can last for hours, days, or even weeks.

Knigge claims she has tried a number of medications over the years, but none have been able to completely relieve her migraines.

“The weather, stress, and a lack of sleep all contribute to my migraines. When the pain becomes unbearable, I spend the entire day in bed, with the lights turned off “Knigge stated. “When I have a migraine, I am completely incapacitated, which is difficult as a mother.”

Despite the fact that there are numerous FDA-approved treatments on the market, experts say that many patients are turning to cannabis products containing THC and/or CBD, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis, to treat their migraines.

“Many migraine patients have been suffering from them for many years but have never discussed them with their doctors. They are, instead, self-medicate with various treatments such as cannabis “said Nathaniel Schuster, MD, UC San Diego Health’s pain management specialist and headache neurologist, and investigator at the UC San Diego Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research. “Right now, we don’t have evidence-based data to answer patients’ questions about whether cannabis works for migraines.”

Schuster and his colleagues at UC San Diego Health are conducting the first known randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of cannabis as a potential treatment for acute migraines.

A total of 20 people are currently enrolled in the clinical trial. Knigge is among them.

“I decided to take part in the trial after hearing about it from Dr. Schuster. I had reached a point where I was willing to try anything to help me manage my migraines “Knigge stated.

The goal is to enroll 90 participants who will be randomized to receive four different treatments for four separate migraine attacks: one with THC, one with CBD, one with a combination of the two, and one with a placebo. A vaporizer is used to administer the products.

“Vaporized cannabis may be more effective for patients who have nausea or gastrointestinal issues with their migraines,” said Shuster, an assistant professor in the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of California, San Diego.

To be eligible for the clinical trial, patients must have migraines at least once a month, be a non-regular cannabis user, not use opioids, and be between the ages of 21 and 65.

“I am proud and grateful to be a part of a study that may result in more tools in the toolbox for those of us who suffer from migraines,” Knigge said. “It could mean that you have one more option if all of your other options have failed. This is extremely important for patients whose lives are regularly disrupted by migraines.”

Schuster stated that future research would compare different cannabinoid doses.

Is there a new high for migraine treatment? The trial investigates the efficacy of THC and CBD.

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